Wed, 24 Jan 2018

Trigger Finger

“Trigger finger,” or stenosing tenosynovitis, is a condition that causes pain, locking, popping or clicking of the fingers or thumb when the hand is opened or closed.

In its early stages, trigger finger can cause pain. Usually, it is tender on your palm where the finger or thumb joins the hand. Sometimes, you feel the pain further along or even on the back of the finger. You might feel like your hands or fingers are stiff or swollen. As it progresses, the tightness can cause the tendon to catch as it tries to glide, leading to a painful snapping sensation when making a fist or opening the hand. Eventually, the finger can get stuck where it is, making it really hard either to straighten or to bend it.

The symptoms are often worst in the mornings immediately after waking up and can occur in any of the fingers or thumbs. People whose work or hobby require repetitive gripping actions are at a higher risk of
developing trigger finger. The condition is also more common for those with diabetes or other inflammatory conditions.

If caught in the early stages, a splint or anti-inflammatory medicines may be able to calm down the symptoms. After this, the first line of treatment is usually a steroid injection into the sheath of the tendon. This helps to decrease the swelling and allow the tendon to glide smoothly again.

If you have had injections that did not work in the past, your symptoms have been happening
for a long time, or your finger is stuck in place, your physician might discuss surgery with you.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms please call Miller Orthopedic Specialists at our Council Bluffs clinic at 712-323- 5333 or our Omaha clinic at at 402-991- 9958 for an appointment.

Tue, 24 Oct 2017

Do You Experience Pain That Radiates From Your Lower Back Down Your Leg?

sciatica pain reliefSciatica is a condition you’ve probably heard about, it’s a painful, annoying condition where you experience pain that radiates down from your lower back, hips, buttocks and down your leg, but only on one side of your body. Sometimes your feet and toes feel tingly and numb. You may even feel shoot­ing, electrical pains going up and down the back or the outside of your thighs and calves.

Sciatica is a term used to describe the symptoms you ex­perience if you have a pinched or compressed sciatic nerve on one side of your body. The two sciatic nerves, one on each side of the body, run down the lengths of your legs. The sciatic nerves are the human body’s largest and longest nerves. These two sciatica nerves connect the spinal cord to the leg muscles of the thigh and lower leg, including the outside of the thigh and the hamstrings (where sciatica pain symptoms are often felt). Each sciatica branches out to the entire leg and foot, and is responsible for controlling the motor and sensory function of each leg.

The most likely cause of your sciatica pain is the pinching of a highly sensitive sciatic nerve root by a nearby herniated or slipped disc in your lower back. When one spinal vertebra slips over another, the protruding segment of bone can im­pinge one of the sciatica nerve roots in the area. This pinching creates inflammation and irritation, which is responsible for a set of symptoms you’ll recognize as prickling, numbness, pain, and possibly weakness of the leg and foot.

More often than not, if your sciatica symptoms are caused by a slipped disc they will resolve on their own with mini­mal treatment. If your pain doesn’t improve, your doctor might suggest some conservative treatment like anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxants, physical therapy or even steroid injections. Surgery is an option if the compressed nerve causes significant weakness or when pain progressively worsens or doesn’t im­prove with other therapies. Since sciatica is a symptom, not a disease, it can be a sign of another underlying spinal condition that may need specific treatment: for example, sciatica can be caused by degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, or spon­dylolisthesis.

The bottom line: if you have sciatica pain, weakness, or numbness, don’t assume it’s a minor annoyance that will go away on its own; a visit to a doctor is needed to diagnose your symptoms and to gauge whether a more serious problem may be the cause of your nerve impairment.

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